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Changes in Saliva Composition before and after Use of Mouthwash Containing Green Tea Extract
Int J Clin Prev Dent 2019;15(2):103-107
Published online June 30, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.15236/ijcpd.2019.15.2.103
© 2019 International Journal of Clinical Preventive Dentistry.

Jung-Eun Park1, Jong-Hwa Jang1, Su-Yeon Hwang2, Da-Hui Kim1, Ja-Won Cho1,3

1Department of Dental Hygiene, College of Health Science, Dankook University, Cheonan, 2Department of Public Health Sciences, Graduate School, Korea University, Seoul, 3Department of Preventive Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan, Korea
Received April 12, 2019; Accepted May 3, 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of green tea extract (GTE) in reducing oral bacteria by analysis of saliva composition before and after using mouthwash containing GTE.
Methods: This study measured organic acids (lactate, acetate, propionate, formate, butyrate, pyruvate, valerate) found in the saliva of 15 healthy adults before and 1, 2, and 4 weeks after use of GTE mouthwash. A Dionex ion chromatography system was used for analysis. During the mobile phase, NaOH 100 mM was applied through isocratic elution.
Results: Changes in saliva composition compared to a control after the use of mouthwash containing GTE, included an increase in lactate during the first and second week followed by a decrease of 0.48 mM (82.74%) in the fourth week. Acetate slightly increased by 0.03 mM (0.46%) compared to the control. Propionate, formate, butyrate, and pyruvate increased 0.11-1.55 mM after four weeks compared with the control. Valerate was not detected.
Conclusion: Seven organic acids were compared. Only lactate decreased after use of the GTE mouthwash. Therefore, the GTE mouthwash in this study has the potential to inhibit the growth of some oral bacteria.
Keywords : Camellia sinensis, lactic acid, oral health, saliva
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June 2019, 15 (2)